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Everlost_MI
07-03-2006, 04:23 AM
Welcome to week twenty-seven of Evil Avatar’s Weekly Comic Book Reviews.

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Remember, these are NOT spoiler-free reviews.

Editor's Note: I apologize for the fuzzy image of the FF TPB, I couldn't find a better one on the 'net.

Week Twenty-seven:
Evil Avatar's Weekly Comic Book Reviews – Year 2 - Week 27

Fantastic Four: Nobody Gets Out Alive TPB
Reviewed by: KefkaTaran (Philip Kollar), Evil Avatar Podcast/Radio Editor
Publisher: Marvel Comics
Writer: Tom DeFalco
Penciler: Paul Ryan
Scripter: Mike Lackey
Inker: Danny Bulanadi
Letterers: Dave Sharpe and Steve Dutro
Colorists: John Kalisz and Lia Pelosi
Editor: Ralph Macchio
Price: Out of a print, but available on Amazon Marketplace (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0785100636/sr=8-1/qid=1150866422/ref=sr_1_1/103-8032134-2666208?%5Fencoding=UTF8
) for as cheap as $2.95.

http://www.evilavatar.com/images/thumbs/comics/ff_noone.jpg

Fantastic Four: Nobody Gets Out Alive was one of the first ever Fantastic Four stories collected in trade paperback. It was also one of the last FF storylines before the ill-fated Heroes Reborn event that raped most of Marvel’s biggest franchises for a year. And it’s also, despite being written in the mid-‘90s, a very old-school FF story, full of crazy, time-traveling, cosmic sci-fi adventures and a writing style comparable to Stan Lee’s – in other words, a style that would make most modern comic readers cringe.

This book is steeply rooted in the convoluted Fantastic Four storylines that Tom DeFalco was crafting in the ‘90s. Among the confusing aspects of the story: Reed Richards is dead replaced for the time being by the Scott Lang version of Ant Man, Franklin Richards has been sent into the future and replaced with an angst-filled teenage version of himself, Reed’s long-lost father is the main villain of the group right now, and Johnny Storm is currently dating (and has impregnated) a Skrull female named Lyja who was previously posing as Ben Grimm’s long-time love Alicia Masters (who Johnny apparently stole from Ben with no qualms whatsoever). Confused enough yet? Good! It gets worse.

This is one of those time travel stories. Yep. Even worse, in fact: they leap around between “time streams”, which basically means hopping to alternate universes where slight shifts in events that happened have left the universes altered greatly. These kind of stories are always either really laid-back and fun-loving (see Dan Slott’s runs on The Thing or She-Hulk) or extremely confusing and headache-inducing (see this book). The time stuff here is explained using that cosmic comic book mumbo jumbo that makes you want to scream with how nonsensical it is. Sure, the overall plot is a somewhat interesting little story that wraps up nicely in one of those classic sci-fi story “oh yeah!” moments, but it’s not all that worthwhile digging through the confusing stuff to find this.

The art, both pencil and color-wise, matches the writing style here in being extremely old-school. It’s serviceable, in a Kirby-cribbing kind of way, but there’s absolutely nothing stunning or even really very exciting about it. Like the rest of the book, it’s nostalgic, reminiscent without actually being impressive at all.

Bottom Line:
Unless you’re really desperate for an old-school fix, avoid this. It’s convoluted, boring, and just not very fun. It’s stuff like this that makes me seriously question those people who say they hate how comics are written nowadays. Knowing your roots is one thing, but actually enjoying them is another entirely.

Rating: Only if you're a collector of the series or the creators. / Avoid like the plague (1 1/2 out of 5 EvilEyes).
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e1_5.jpg


X-Factor #8 (An ongoing series)
Reviewed by: Everlost_MI (Brian K. Nichols), Editor in Chief
Publisher: Marvel Comics
Writer: Peter David
Art: Dennis Calero
Color Art: Jose Villarrubia
Letters: VC’s Cory Petit
Cove Art: Ryan Sook
Editor: Andy Schmidt
Price: $2.99 US/$4.25 CAN

http://www.evilavatar.com/images/thumbs/comics/xfactor8.jpg

The mystery of Layla deepens as Quicksilver makes his way to Mutant Town attempting to re-power mutants with the Inhuman Terrigen Mists that he absorbed. Unfortunately for those he re-powers the results are short-lived and end tragically. One of Jamie Madrox’s duplicates shows up to the X-Factor headquarters as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. and get part of the team to sign the Super Hero Registration Act. While the apparent original Jamie Madrox along with Guido discovers that Damian Sr. and Jr. are carbon copies of each other. The issue ends with Siryn using her new found power to coax the truth of the Decimation out of Spider-Man while Quicksilver and Layla clearly draw lines in the sand as being adversaries before he enters the X-Factor Investigations building.

Peter David has created enjoyable multiple storylines that are quickly becoming deeper as they intertwine with each other. The dialogue is snappy and the characterizations are superb as a reader can clearly see that David is enjoying his time on the title. The artwork by Dennis Calero and Jose Villarrubia is excellent with facial expressions and body language used to accentuate the humor and the drama of David’s script. The varied use of shadows and bright colors created an excellent contrast that added to the atmosphere of the entire issue.

Bottom Line:
This is an excellent issue and series if you enjoy superhero stories with a touch of humor and sarcasm. X-Factor is one of the few Marvel comics that is taking the House of M, Decimation and the Civil War crossovers and use them to not only fill in the blanks but push those storylines further. Peter David’s work in this title to date has been excellent and the artwork has been quite remarkable.

Rating: Worth the time and the money. (4 1/2 out of 5 EvilEyes).
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e4_5.jpg

Everlost_MI
07-03-2006, 04:24 AM
Batman #654 (An ongoing series)
Reviewed by: Everlost_MI (Brian K. Nichols), Editor in Chief
Publisher: DC Comics
Writer: James Robinson
Penciler: Don Kramer
Inker: Wayne Faucher
Colorist: John Kalisz
Letterer: Travis Lanham
Editor: Peter Tomasi
Price: $2.99 US/$4.00 CAN

http://www.evilavatar.com/images/thumbs/comics/batman654.jpg

The World’s Greatest Detective deduces who’s behind the framing of Two-Face as well as the murder of Orca but at the cost of losing Harvey Dent to his Two-Face persona. The issue ends with Bruce offering Tim a permanent place in his life as his adopted son beyond being his crime fighting partner.

James Robison’s final issue has setup an interesting set of storylines for Grant Morrison to assume in the next issue. Aside from the setup, the issue moves too briskly for the cost of the book. The artwork is enjoyable but as of next issue, Andy Kubert takes over the reins.

Bottom Line:
If you’re collecting this series this will end up in your collection because you need it, the final few pages of Bruce offering to adopt Tim is touching but I am sure it will be revisited in future issues.

Rating: Decent, but leaf through it before buying it./ Only if you're a collector of the series/character. (2 1/2 out of 5 EvilEyes)
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e2_5.jpg

Action Comics #840 (An ongoing series)
Reviewed by: Everlost_MI (Brian K. Nichols), Editor in Chief
Publisher: DC Comics
Writer: Geoff Johns & Kurt Busiek
Art: Pete Woods
Colors: Brad Anderson
Letters: Rob Leigh
Cover: Terry and Rachel Dodson
Editor: Matt Idelson
Price: $2.99 US/$4.00 CAN

http://www.evilavatar.com/images/thumbs/comics/actioncomics840.jpg

This final issue of the Up, Up and Away storyline re-establishes Superman’s place in the DC Universe with amplified but slightly changed superpowers as well as the creation of a second Fortress of Solitude. Some things never change, as Luthor escapes prison within the same issue he’s incarcerated, Jimmy gets his Superman signal-watch back, the world still loves Superman and finally Lois shows the world she wears the pants in her marriage as Mr. Lane.

Geoff Johns and Kurt Busiek’s strong characterizations and dialogue matched with superb artwork created by Pete Woods resulted in an enjoyable issue that cemented Superman firmly back in the DC Universe While planting the seeds, especially with the modified superpowers, of future plotlines with the promise of fruition with Busiek staying on board for both Action Comics and Superman titles.

Bottom Line:
If you haven’t been reading this storyline, I would recommend waiting for the next issue that kicks off the next storyarc. However, Geoff Johns and Kurt Busiek as a whole did an excellent job during this storyline of bringing fun to the Man of Steel for both the occasional and die-hard fans. Finally, Good or bad, this storyline has some strong similarities to the recently released Superman Returns movie.

Rating: Worth the money and time. / Decent, but leaf through it before buying it. (3 1/2 out of 5 EvilEyes).
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e3_5.jpg


What else is worth reading this week…

Everlost’s take:
· Daredevil #86 – Nail biting drama and pulse pounding action with an ending that will definitely make you come back for more.
· Young Avengers #12 – A solid ending to the first volume. It’s a shame it’s going to be awhile before volume two is produced.


KefkaTaran’s take:
· DCU: Brave New World - 80 pages for a dollar! There's little way to
go wrong here, as you get a solid bunch of short stories previewing a batch of new DC books coming out in the next two months as well as a couple extra pages that will likely be leading into whatever next big event lies in DC's future. And it's only a buck!
· 52 #8 - Steel starts taking his name a bit more literally, a new mystery hero takes Booster's place in Metropolis, and Ralph starts putting the pieces together during a run-in with everyone's favorite liberal activist superhero, Green Arrow. This series remains intriguing, and it's hard to imagine where they'll end up taking it with over 40 issues left.

Evil Avatar
07-03-2006, 04:56 AM
Did you pick up X Isle?

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 05:08 AM
On the What else is worth reading this week... side of things, I have to add the following: Amazing Spider-man #533, Exiles #83, Fantastic Four #538, and New Avengers #21. I guess I'll try and give some mini-reviews off the top of my head (mostly because I'm bored, and no one else here seems to pimp Exiles). Not spoiler free, not at all.

Amazing Spider-man #533 (http://www.marvel.com/catalog/?id=4277)
http://static.flickr.com/45/180597322_1c6ef426e4_m.jpg

The Low Down: Spider-man revealed his identity to the world recently in the big Civil War book, and this issue of Amazing Spider-man is the first of Spidey's new multi-book story-arc, The War At Home. This arc is going to be focusing directly on Peter Parker's life, and how it has been affected by revealing his identity to the world.

This particular issue starts out with a comical look at what is happening just as Peter reveals his identity (including crashing the internet, all of it, including the porn sites). We see Jameson's reaction, as well as the mixed response from the population at large. This issue itself isn't going to be something you'll remember years from now, it is just the introduction to the new arc as a whole. We see Spidey's villains begining to plot, Jameson acting out in a way that will inevetiably lead to another situation of Spidey being in court (I don't know how many times it has happend now, but I can count at least five situations off the top of my head), as well as the growing tension between Iron Man and Spidey. The end of this book strengthens my argument that this is a book that you need to read if you want the full effect of the civil war. Over all, I'd give this issue 3/5, there is a lot of interesting stuff going on in the issue but none of it is explored with any depth. If you plan on reading any of the Spidey books for the next couple of months, this is a issue you have to read.

Exiles #83 (http://www.marvel.com/catalog/?id=4259)
http://static.flickr.com/58/180597329_2f198320bb_m.jpg

The Low Down: The Exiles have lost quite a few people over the years that the book has been running, with the only original members left being Blink and Morph (which is questionable at this point). Just recently Mimic was lost in their lengthy battle with the Earth-616 Proteus during the World Tour multi-arc. Now they have Proteus under control, locked in the body of Morph and fooled into thinking that he himself is Morph by technology aquired from The Squadron Supreme.

This issue is a wrap-up for the World Tour multi-arc, focusing on the people lost during the long run of The Exiles. We see old friends and enemies laid to rest, while everyone struggles with the knowledge that their friend Morph is currently out of commission while they keep Proteus at bay inside his body. The end of the book looks to Blink as she returns Mimic's body to his home world, putting an end to the idea that he might somehow be resurrected. This is an issue for those who have been with the book for a long time, bringing closure to it as it approaches transfer to a new creative team (Claremont). It wraps up everything except the Morph/Proteus situation, which I assume is something Claremont wanted for his first arc. Originally this issue was planned to be the last before Claremont took over, but because of health issues he has been delayed, and thus there will be a couple of filler issues added on by the current staff. I give this issue 2/5, it is nice to see them dealing with the dead but it covers ground that has been gone over before. It also wastes quite a bit of time with a stupid throw-away fight with an alternate universe Iron Man instead of focusing on the story. Pick it up if you've been with the Exiles for a long time, but skip it if you are just wanting to get into the book. Buy a TPB instead or wait for Claremont to start his run.

(More mini-reviews to come <.<)

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 05:45 AM
Fantastic Four #538 (http://www.marvel.com/catalog/?id=4262)
http://static.flickr.com/58/180597333_16709f90a7_m.jpg

The Low Down: The first battles of the civil war are being waged on the streets of New York as the remaining members of The Fantastic Four watch over a comatose Johnny Storm. This issue assumes that you have read both The Civil War book, and The Fantastic Four: The Road to Civil War tie-in. During The Road to Civil War we saw Thor's Hammer return to Earth, bringing with it Dr. Doom who escaped from Hell by hitchhiking on it's wave of power through the dimensions. Now everyone wants a chance at being the new Thor, traveling from all over the world to the crater the hammer rests in, all of them trying to pick it up, and all of them failing. Johnny Storm has been hospitalized after being attacked by a mob of people on the street shortly following the incidents of Civil War #01, and Reed Richards has signed on with the pro-registration faction of heroes along with Iron Man, and Hank Pym.

This issue picks up in the hospital, members of The Fantastic Four around the bed of Johnny Storm, but with Reed seemingly disinterested. Sue has been portrayed as having serious doubts about the SHR, and her husband's lack of concern for her brother is again foreshadowing an on-coming conflict within the team. We don't see much of Reed in this issue, and so none of the plans that he, Hank Pym, and Tony Stark have been cooking up are revealed. Instead, the issue primarily focuses on Ben Grimm (The Thing) as he struggles with the issues surrounding him. His best friend lay in a hospital bed while a war is being fought outside, a war that he hasn't chosen a side for yet. As always, the contemporary Ben Grimm is being shown as a contemplative, wise man, rather than the brute that one would think by judgeing him from his appearence. He takes to the streets as hero battles hero, not taking part in the fight, instead trying to convince a civillian anti-SHR group from rioting. His indecisivness, Sue's frustration, and Reed's conviction all seem to be leading toward the possible break-up of Marvel's first-family. In the end we see a mysterious figure appraoch Thor's Hammer and lift it from it's resting spot. Thor has returned, and just in time to get a piece of The Civil War! Overall, I give this issue 4/5. The writing is everything you'd expect from Straczynski and it both continues on-going plot as well as setting up new problems for future issues. Definetly a must-read, and a good place to pick up if you want to get into the book.

New Avengers #21 (http://www.marvel.com/catalog/?id=4283)
http://static.flickr.com/59/180597340_5e8d727a42_m.jpg

The Low Down: Captain America is on the run from S.H.I.E.L.D. and every cop in the country as he makes a stand against the SHR. His best friend Tony Stark has sided against him, and Cap has been forced to take up arms against his own country.

This issue picks up directly after the events of Civil War #01, starting with Cap hiding out and eventually fighting a group of well-equiped S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, all while relaying an extended inner-monologue. He is soon on the run again, and after blacking out he finds himself in an old safe house belonging to Nick Fury. With him is Falcon, an old friend who declares allegiance to Cap and his cause. Knowing that the war is coming they begin a quest to seek out allies, starting in the super-hero hub of the world, New York City. They first want to get Spider-man, but see from a'far that Spidey has already chosen his side. Cap kicks himself for not being the one to take Peter under his wing during his time of need, and knows that the bond between Peter and Tony will not be easily broken. Moving on, Cap visits another old friend and hopeful ally: Hank Pym. It doesn't take long to figure out where Pym (who is surprised that Cap thinks that much of him) stands, leading to yet another S.H.I.E.L.D. conflict as Pym somewhat-reluctently betrays Cap and Falcon. The two escape, but not before Cap pleases comic fans everywhere by once again breaking Pym's nose. I would give this issue a 3/5, it is an excellent read but the fights with S.H.I.E.L.D. seem underdone. That is what I would do, except Cap broke Pym's nose again, so I'll give it two bonus points for a total of 5/5!

swiftdraw
07-03-2006, 06:17 AM
Just to point out, Siryn has used the voice thingy before, so I wouldn't call it a "new found power." Once when they were getting into a crime scene and they first bump into Singularity and during the riots when she tries to "sweet talk" the police into standing down. In the latter incident, the police's helments did negate the effects of the voice control power, so she ended up screaming and bowling them all over.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 06:28 AM
Editor's Note: I apologize for the fuzzy image of the FF TPB, I couldn't find a better one on the 'net.

Probably for the better.

Did you pick up X Isle?

I didn't, but you know that looked really interesting. I'd love to hear what people thought if anyone else picked it up.

Also, I should apologize for my "What's else is good segments", since I only get a couple books from the local shop. The rest come from BCB so they usually arrive a few days after the reviews, so I can't really use this week's books except for the few I pick up. I could start going into last week's, but I don't want to confuse people. :p

AspectVoid
07-03-2006, 06:42 AM
I did my write ups for Spidey, New Avengers, and Fantastic Four over in the Comic Day thread, so if there is someone out there who cares what I think, it can be found there. Watching all of the comics blow up in the characters faces is quite amusing for me.

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 06:43 AM
I was completly unaware of X Isle until you guys brought it up, and after googling it I've decided that I need to read it. I'm hoping Eureka will be good, judgeing it by the previews, and this is by the same guy. Neat concept too, from the sound of it.

balamoor
07-03-2006, 06:51 AM
It’s stuff like this that makes me seriously question those people who say they hate how comics are written nowadays.

Yeah Evil but this is just plain horrible for old school, There is a difference between decent old school (And Sorry I thought Stan back in his hey day was a decent comic writer apparently so did many other writers seeing how he was copied so much) And the modern Lets shove gritty and edgy down your throat so you can see how controversial we are.

normyk
07-03-2006, 06:52 AM
I grabbed X-Isle. Not bad, though there were some rather cliche things in it. I gave it a quick once through so I can't really go so far as to review it (need to give it another read) but I think that things should pick up some in the next issue and I'm going to stick around for at least that much to see where it goes.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 07:17 AM
Yeah Evil but this is just plain horrible for old school, There is a difference between decent old school

I assume you mean me. And yes, you're right on this.

(And Sorry I thought Stan back in his hey day was a decent comic writer apparently so did many other writers seeing how he was copied so much)

I'll agree here. I love some old Stan Lee. Of course, some of it's crap, but at his best, he's great fun.

And the modern Lets shove gritty and edgy down your throat so you can see how controversial we are.

And I didn't mean to imply I prefer this -- merely that I think comics nowadays are all-around MUCH better written than they were 60, 40, 20, 10, and even 5 years ago. The bar of quality has just been raised immensely as of late, and we're getting a lot of damned good stuff out of it (in both the Stan Lee, more fun style [Dan Slott] and in the more edgy stuff [Warren Ellis]).

Spigot
07-03-2006, 08:14 AM
The mid-90's is probably the worst period to draw on for a look at how comics were "way back then"... There were a lot of the same elements being used then that are being used today (angst, dark, gritty tales for example) but they weren't well written at that point. It was like comics were being designed by a marketing committee instead of by capable writers and they did not age well at all.

Good reviews Kef & Everlost (and even Perigon). I really need to read a summary of House of M and Decimation so I know what the heck happened there. Makes me somewhat glad that I didn't get a copy of X-Factor :)

Has anyone else picked up the new Star Wars: Legacy series? If not, I might do a little review. The preview issue that was out a week or two ago was pretty cool and the first issue does set up an interesting take on the Star Wars universe 100 year or so past the Battle of Yavin.

Oh, one last thing. Due to the holiday this week, are comics being pushed back a day or are they still expected to be in the local shops on Wednesday?

lpmiller
07-03-2006, 08:25 AM
The tom defalco era on FF was crap. When he booted out Walt - who was doing great things powering up the Thing, updating Dr. Doom, and pulling off the awesome issue where reed and doom fight through a segment of time, Loki supercharging the torch....FF was fantastic. And then he got crap canned for no reason, and defalco came in and just...tossed everything walt set up away, with no rhyme or reason to it, no real explaination, and I stopped getting FF about 3 issues into his run. I can't even believe they decided to TPB that crap run.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 08:25 AM
The mid-90's is probably the worst period to draw on for a look at how comics were "way back then"... There were a lot of the same elements being used then that are being used today (angst, dark, gritty tales for example) but they weren't well written at that point.

Looking at my pick specifically, though, it wasn't grim n'gritty that was the problem. It was a terrible story that was written in the old-school fashion (I have read lots of old stuff as well). And more than anything, it just wasn't good.

I really need to read a summary of House of M and Decimation so I know what the heck happened there. Makes me somewhat glad that I didn't get a copy of X-Factor

You should get it. And basically all you need to know about House of M is: mostly boring alternate reality story that ended with one big change to status quo -- most of the mutants becoming depowered. Only a few hundred powered mutants.


Oh, one last thing. Due to the holiday this week, are comics being pushed back a day or are they still expected to be in the local shops on Wednesday?

From what I've heard, it's pushed back a day in the U.S. due to mail being a day late. Should be normal in Canada, though, I think?

The tom defalco era on FF was crap. When he booted out Walt - who was doing great things powering up the Thing, updating Dr. Doom, and pulling off the awesome issue where reed and doom fight through a segment of time, FF was fantastic. And then he got crap canned for no reason, and defalco came in and just...tossed everything walt set up away, with no rhyme or reason to it, no real explaination, and I stopped getting FF about 3 issues into his run. I can't even believe they decided to TPB that crap run.

Yeah, I've heard Walt's run is amazing. I wonder if any of that is collected? Not sure.

Deadend
07-03-2006, 08:47 AM
I really hate older comics.

I read some old Stan Lee stuff, around Daredevil #1.... the writing is horrible. It has a horrible flow, is full of thought balloons, and explanation heavy. The only thing that I find to be great is how they were original at that time.

Savok
07-03-2006, 09:41 AM
This book is steeply rooted in the convoluted Fantastic Four storylines that Tom DeFalco was crafting in the ‘90s. Among the confusing aspects of the story: Reed Richards is dead replaced for the time being by the Scott Lang version of Ant Man, Franklin Richards has been sent into the future and replaced with an angst-filled teenage version of himself, Reed’s long-lost father is the main villain of the group right now, and Johnny Storm is currently dating (and has impregnated) a Skrull female named Lyja who was previously posing as Ben Grimm’s long-time love Alicia Masters (who Johnny apparently stole from Ben with no qualms whatsoever). Confused enough yet? Good! It gets worse.
Let me guess, they bring in Wolverine and his newly cloned sister made out of spam...

Curses, just time travel.

Mind you, Astonishing X-Men 15 has the greatest Wolverine moment, well, ever.

thecrazyd
07-03-2006, 10:10 AM
Mind you, Astonishing X-Men 15 has the greatest Wolverine moment, well, ever.
Agreed. And the cover of 16 is priceless.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 10:18 AM
Mind you, Astonishing X-Men 15 has the greatest Wolverine moment, well, ever.

So totally agreed. Man. Fucking Wolverine. Fuck. (Good guess on where the more confusion comes in.)

agentgray
07-03-2006, 10:59 AM
Ok, I've got Astonishing 15 and I don't get why, it's ever?

Paper dolls? Then LOL.

thecrazyd
07-03-2006, 11:01 AM
Yes. Paper dolls. Also "The moose has caught my sent! O!"

MosBen
07-03-2006, 11:23 AM
God, I haven't read the Exiles, but I've liked the stuff that I've heard about it. Claremont though...if I were a real fan of the series I'd be seriously worried.

As to the old vs new comics debate, there are certainly some older comics out there that are amazingly good, but I'm totally with Kef about the rising quality in comics over the years. Even some of the better old stuff is really just good ideas coupled with mediocre, at best, writing. Back then they really over-relied on heavy handed explanations and thought bubbles.

As for what I'm reading...I'm *still* waiting on orders from Amazon.com, but I got impatient so I went down to my local comic shop and picked up the first trade of DMZ. I don't really have time at the moment for a really thorough review, but I will say that I liked it. I usually don't expect much from first trades; usually just expecting them to lay the groundwork for future stories without being super exciting in their own right. DMZ: On The Ground is better than average in this regard. The characters and situations are interesting, with a couple good stories in there to boot. I just wish there was more than one trade out there so I could get a bit more into the meat of the story.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 11:59 AM
As to the old vs new comics debate, there are certainly some older comics out there that are amazingly good, but I'm totally with Kef about the rising quality in comics over the years. Even some of the better old stuff is really just good ideas coupled with mediocre, at best, writing. Back then they really over-relied on heavy handed explanations and thought bubbles.

You know, really thinking about this, I completely think it's the case. Even with the Stan Lee stuff I mentioned liking earlier, what I like is that he has really fun, wild, interesting ideas. The writing? It's VERY mediocre at best and pure shit at worst.

I'd love to hear more about DMZ. I'm thinking about picking that trade up myself.

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 01:11 PM
God, I haven't read the Exiles, but I've liked the stuff that I've heard about it. Claremont though...if I were a real fan of the series I'd be seriously worried.

Why? This is exactly the kind of shit that Claremont needs to be writing. It doesn't matter how crazy things get because with The Exiles, the crazier the better.

Dr.Finger
07-03-2006, 01:27 PM
Just to point out, Siryn has used the voice thingy before, so I wouldn't call it a "new found power." Once when they were getting into a crime scene and they first bump into Singularity and during the riots when she tries to "sweet talk" the police into standing down. In the latter incident, the police's helments did negate the effects of the voice control power, so she ended up screaming and bowling them all over.
But she never had the power before the present X-Factor series, although to be fair she's lost her powers so many times in the past it's about time she got a bump up.

Drinking_Buddy
07-03-2006, 02:18 PM
Personally the only FF books worth picking up these days is Ultimate: FF, Thing and anything with Dr. Doom.

Marvel Knights 4 just ended, and even that was nothing compared to its former glory 2 years ago.

I picked up FF: Civil War, but thats going to be the only issue. It looks like its mostly going to be about Ben Grimm, and I can read him in The Thing and the Thor side story does not interest me.

MosBen
07-03-2006, 03:16 PM
Perigon, it's not so much the craziness of the stories that I'd worry about; it's the fact that he can't write either dialog or exposition. Plus, he can't seem to avoid writing his female characters into near nude fight scenes.

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 03:23 PM
Personally the only FF books worth picking up these days is Ultimate: FF, Thing and anything with Dr. Doom.

And Thing is ending this week. :(

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 03:37 PM
Plus, he can't seem to avoid writing his female characters into near nude fight scenes.

That certainly is a plus!

http://static.flickr.com/46/181077713_9da90c17ee_o.jpg

homunculus
07-03-2006, 04:12 PM
Mind you, Astonishing X-Men 15 has the greatest Wolverine moment, well, ever.

That's the best part of Astonishing X-Men. The stories, writing, and art are of course all great, but it is the little moments that make the book Astonishing. When Kitty and Colossus were getting hot and heavy and she orgasms and phases through the bed, that was, without pretty much any doubt, the best moment in the X-Men universe, ever.

Everlost_MI
07-03-2006, 04:26 PM
Did you pick up X Isle?
Nope, I'll have to see if Kish @ BCB has any copies of it.

Everlost_MI
07-03-2006, 04:30 PM
On the What else is worth reading this week... side of things,
Good reviews Perigon, thanks for sharing!

Just to point out, Siryn has used the voice thingy before, so I wouldn't call it a "new found power." Once when they were getting into a crime scene and they first bump into Singularity and during the riots when she tries to "sweet talk" the police into standing down. In the latter incident, the police's helments did negate the effects of the voice control power, so she ended up screaming and bowling them all over.
True, perhaps I should have worded it as in a recently acquired/refined power.

I did my write ups for Spidey, New Avengers, and Fantastic Four over in the Comic Day thread, so if there is someone out there who cares what I think, it can be found there. Watching all of the comics blow up in the characters faces is quite amusing for me.
Add a link to make it easier for everyone to see, if you don't mind.

Savok
07-03-2006, 06:10 PM
Yes, that was probably the greatest Kitty scene ever as well.

Spigot
07-03-2006, 06:18 PM
That's the best part of Astonishing X-Men. The stories, writing, and art are of course all great, but it is the little moments that make the book Astonishing. When Kitty and Colossus were getting hot and heavy and she orgasms and phases through the bed, that was, without pretty much any doubt, the best moment in the X-Men universe, ever.
Which issue was this? I totally forget that scene...

Savok
07-03-2006, 06:20 PM
Issue 14 I believe.

Spigot
07-03-2006, 06:21 PM
Issue 14 I believe.
Hmm... I'll have to have another look at that then...

Deadend
07-03-2006, 07:05 PM
eww, Claremont writing Exiles. Just, no... the guy's comics seem to have almost no sense of humor.

I say give it to Ellis and make it almost like Nextwave... but with Mutants, and reality hopping.

Heretic Machine
07-03-2006, 07:10 PM
eww, Claremont writing Exiles. Just, no... the guy's comics seem to have almost no sense of humor.

I say give it to Ellis and make it almost like Nextwave... but with Mutants, and reality hopping.

I say give it to Dan Slott, Peter David, JMS, or even back to Judd Winick. But then again, what do I know?

Kefkataran
07-03-2006, 11:53 PM
I say give it to Dan Slott, Peter David, JMS, or even back to Judd Winick. But then again, what do I know?

Winnick's DC exclusive right now. And most of his stuff seems to be very coldly-received by fans, although both his OYL series (Green Arrow and Outsiders) have been apparantly pretty good. Not that into JMS, but both Peter David and Dan Slott could do really interesting shit on that book. So could Ellis.

Slott's getting a new apparantly awesome concept series coming out of Civil War. I'm sooooo anxious to hear what it is.

Heretic Machine
07-04-2006, 12:00 AM
Winnick's DC exclusive right now. And most of his stuff seems to be very coldly-received by fans, although both his OYL series (Green Arrow and Outsiders) have been apparantly pretty good. Not that into JMS, but both Peter David and Dan Slott could do really interesting shit on that book. So could Ellis.

Slott's getting a new apparantly awesome concept series coming out of Civil War. I'm sooooo anxious to hear what it is.

How about Chuck Austen, does he still do Marvel? He did my favorite run on the Exiles, just after Winick left.

Kefkataran
07-04-2006, 12:05 AM
How about Chuck Austen, does he still do Marvel? He did my favorite run on the Exiles, just after Winick left.

Holy Christ, no. Austen got run out of comics a long time ago. I have no idea about his run on Exiles at all, but the stuff he did with the X-Men got him summarily shunned and hated by almost all fans. Last big thing I know of that he did was a two-issue story in Ultimate X-Men introducing Ultimate Gambit that was actually quite good, but besides that he's basically just fodder for comic book messageboards these days.

Heretic Machine
07-04-2006, 12:30 AM
Holy Christ, no. Austen got run out of comics a long time ago. I have no idea about his run on Exiles at all, but the stuff he did with the X-Men got him summarily shunned and hated by almost all fans. Last big thing I know of that he did was a two-issue story in Ultimate X-Men introducing Ultimate Gambit that was actually quite good, but besides that he's basically just fodder for comic book messageboards these days.

Ahh... damn <.< His Exiles run was great. It was just 26-30, 38-40, 43-45, but it was good stuff. Guess this just proves that normally bad writers can do good stuff in a weird book like Exiles.

Kefkataran
07-04-2006, 10:33 AM
Ahh... damn <.< His Exiles run was great. It was just 26-30, 38-40, 43-45, but it was good stuff. Guess this just proves that normally bad writers can do good stuff in a weird book like Exiles.

I haven't read any of Austen's X-Men, but if his little Ultimate X-Men 2-issue story is any indication, the man CAN write a good story if he wants. Apparantly the major issue with his X-Men run is that he completely ignored characterization and history in order to shoot for political/social/religious messages. I know people doing that in comics is something that is complained about a lot on here, but I think the real problem is when people do it badly.