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Dr.Finger
10-29-2006, 07:04 AM
Welcome to week Forty-Four of Evil Avatar’s Weekly Comic Book Reviews.

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Remember, these are NOT spoiler-free reviews.

Week Forty-Four
Evil Avatar's Weekly Comic Book Reviews - Year 2 - Week 44

Seven Soldiers of Victory #1
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writer: Grant Morrison
Artist: J.H. Williams III
Colorist: Dave Stewart
Letterer: Todd Klein
Editor: Peter Tomasi
$3.99

http://aycu36.webshots.com/image/5515/2004590082215530456_rs.jpg

"The Miser's Coat"

We open in The Tailor's Shop; seen previously in the Zatanna mini, as the Tailor entertains his client with a tale of The Seven Soldiers who are destined to save the world from an evil queen, yet never meet. We then move to the far distant future where The Shining Knight Sir Ystin, stepping out of the cauldron of rebirth, greets Gloriana Tenebrae, Queen of the Sheeda, in her throne room. We then move 40,000 years in our past, when the New Gods came to Earth and created Aurakles, the first superhero. Aurakles is given seven items of power and set to tame the Earth. Eons pass and Neanderthal super scientists create a time machine, which is sent into the future where Melmoth, scavenger King of the Sheeda, finds it. And so begins the first harrowing of Earth. The next harrowing occurs 30 millennia later, in the days of King Arthur and his knights, but the Sheeda and their Castle Revolving crush them as well. Back in present day New York The Guardian leads the defense against the Sheeda hordes, Bulleteer tries to get help for her nemesis and Zatanna & Misty fly to the rescue with a horde of flying horses. Misty, Zatanna's apprentice and daughter of Melmoth, knocks her teacher out so she can confront her stepmother, Gloriana Tenebrae. Before Misty can get far she is confronted by Klarion, who steals her magic die, (which he calls a Croatoan, the Sheeda word for Fatherbox) and escapes. Zatanna wakes up just as the Castle Revolving pops into existence over Manhattan. On the bridge of the Castle Frankenstein informs SHADE that the Sheeda are not aliens, or extra dimensional, but what humans will become in a billion years. Just as Frankenstein is about to finish the Sheeda Klarion, who still possesses power to control 'Grundy-Men', stops him. High over Manhattan Gloriana and Sir Ystin fight fiercely until Ystin is thrown off the Castle Revolving, only to be saved by his Flying Horse. At street level Mister Miracle confronts Darkseid in human guise. The Lord of Apokolips has struck a deal with the Sheeda, they get the Americas to ravage, and Darkseid gets Aurakles. Shilo offers to take Aurakles' place as Darkseid's captive, claiming that he will make his greatest escape. Darkseid agrees since Shilo, the New Gods spirit of Life and Freedom, is the one he actually wants. Darkseid then pulls out a pistol and shoots Shilo in the head, killing him. Back on the castle Gloriana is about to send her assassin, I, Spyder, to kill her step-daughter Misty when he turns on the Queen of the Sheeda, shooting her in the head with an arrow and dropping her to the street below. On the street below she is struck and killed by 'the spear thrown by mighty Aurakles 42,000 years ago' in the form of the car driven by Bulleteer as her nemesis, Sonic Sally, tries to kill her. We end with scenes showing Sir Ystin attending a girl's school (yes in this version Shining Knight is a girl), The Tailor sewing up Zor (from the Zatanna mini) into the Miser's Coat, Klarion as the new lord of the Sheeda and Mister Miracle's grave as he rises out of it.

The first thing that has to be said about this book is the art. J.H. Williams III produces some of the most amazing art ever seen in a comic book, and his work is even more extraordinary when you see the different art styles he uses for each of the Soldier's chapters. And the art isn't just pretty, it's creative and well thought out, traits you don't always get with other 'pretty' pencillers. There are about a dozen different panels and pages in this issue that should be hanging in a museum. The story Morrison tries to tell also deserves praise; its epic, audacious and has a lot of heart. Unfortunately the story is so epic and convoluted that it's often hard to understand. The story jumps from the distant past to the distant future and back to the present several times while (possibly) breaking the fourth wall at times as well. Several of the Soldiers, Frankenstein and Guardian, didn't seem to do too much in this issue at all. It took me a while to figure out that Bulleteer is apparently Aurakles' descendant, and hence the spear thrown 42,000 years ago that finally found its mark. Ultimately while I think the ideas behind the book were top notch, the presentation was so muddled and convoluted that it made it difficult to fully enjoy. The six-month delay definitely hurt as well. I just don't remember a lot of the details of the seven mini-series, details that may have shed some light on this book.

Bottom Line:
Great art and an epic story that collapsed under the weight of it's own high concept.

Rating: Decent, but leaf through it before buying it. (3 out of 5 EvilEyes)
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e3.jpg

Sensational Spider-Man #31
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writer: Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
Penciller: Angel Medina
Inker: Scott Hanna
Colorist: Dan Kemp
Letterer: Cory Petit
Editor: Warren Simons
$2.99

http://aycu08.webshots.com/image/5607/2004528831784955666_rs.jpg

"The Deadly Foes of Peter Parker, part 3"

As Peter responds to his old flame Liz Allan's distress call The Chameleon, disguised as Peter, worms his way into Avenger's Tower and next to Aunt May. Peter and Liz hash our some lingering resentment before he is ambushed by The Molten Man, The Scarecrow and Will O' The Wisp. Spidey is taking a beating when Black Shows up and they make quick work of the 3 villains. Molten Man tells Peter that the real target is Aunt May and he goes swinging off to save her. Back in Avenger's Tower May is baking cookies for the man she thinks is her nephew. The Chameleon is fantasizing about strangling the elderly woman as the two engage in conversations about cookies, locked doors and yarn. Aunt May has the last laugh however. She knew immediately that it wasn't Peter, so she ground up some of Mary Jane's sleeping pills into the cookies she was baking and fed them to the fake Peter. The real Spidey crashes through the window only to find The Chameleon already unconscious on the floor.

I like the bad-ass, self sufficient Aunt May. For all too long she was portrayed as a doddering victim-in-waiting, so its nice to see her written as competent for once. The rest of the story was a nice exploration of the consequences of Peter's unmasking, but it just wasn't particularly gripping. Angel Medina's art looks a lot like Todd McFarland's Spiderman work from the early 90's. So much so that it distracts from his otherwise competent work. Both of the Spiderman satellite books (Spectacular and Friendly Neighborhood) have been good but both also feel like they're treading water while moving from crossover to crossover.

Bottom Line:
A fun story but not a particularly memorable one

Rating: Decent, but leaf through it before buying it. (3 out of 5 EvilEyes)
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e3.jpg


Action Comics #844
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writers: Geoff Johns & Richard Donner
Artist: Adam Kubert
Colorist: Dave Stewart
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Editor: Matt Idleson
$2.99

http://aycu10.webshots.com/image/6969/2004530520960172983_rs.jpg

"Last Son, part 1"

Superman, after visiting with a computer simulation of his father in his Fortress of Solitude, returns to Metropolis in time to catch a shell-shaped object as it rocketed to Earth. Inside the object is a child. Superman brings the child, who looks about 8, to the Department of Metahuman Affairs where is quickly becomes apparent that the child is Kryptonian. The DMA later learns that the rocket containing the child came not from outer space but from hyperspace. Clark doesn't know what to do with the child, all he knows is the feelings he already has towards the boy. The next day Superman goes to visit with the child but the lab has been stripped down. The child is gone. An enraged Superman forces his way into the Pentagon to get some answers from the DMA head, Sarge Steel. The military convoy transporting the child is ambushed and the child taken away. Finally, on the Kent's farm, Clark shows up with the child and asks his parents to help him raise the boy.

A good start. While the book seemed a little light at times the seeds of some very interesting storylines were planted, first and foremost: Is the boy really a Kryptonian? With almost any other creative team such a huge change for the character would be inconceivable, but the Johns-Donner combo is big enough that you really feel this change may stick. And there in also lies a problem. This run has been so hyped for so long that this first issue felt like a bit of a let down. It may be unfair, anything short of instant classic would have fallen short of the hype, but my initial reaction was: That's it? The lack of an overt villain, other than a one-page tease from Lex Luthor, brings the book down a notch, but not substantially. Adam Kubert's art seemed very sketchy at times. In some places it worked well, in others it looked rushed or incomplete.

Bottom Line:
A good start to a storyline with a lot of potential

Rating: Worth the money and time. (4 out of 5 EvilEyes)
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e4.jpg

Dr.Finger
10-29-2006, 07:07 AM
Ultimate Marvel Team-Up Ultimate Collection TPB
Reviewed By: Philip Kollar (KefKataran)
Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Artists: Mike Allred, Mark Bagley, Dan Brereton, Jason Burrows, Frank Cho, Chyna Clugston-Major, Michael Gaydos, Dave Gibbons, Phil Hester, Leonard Kirk, James Kolchalka, Andy Lee, David Mack, Jim Mahfood, Alex Maleev, Rick Mays, Ted McKeever, Al Milgrom, Terry Moore, Scott Morse, Michael Avon Oeming, Terry Pallot, Jason Pearson, Sean Phillips, Rodney Ramos, Ron Randall, John Romita Sr., P. Craig Russel, Bill Sienkiewicz, Art Thibert, Craig Thompson, John Totleben, Matt Wagner, Brett Weldele, Walden Wong, and Ashley Wood
Inkers: Ande Parks and Walden Wong
Colors: Transparency Digital and Digital Chameleon
Letterers: Wes Abbott, Comicraft, Chris Eliopoulos, and Sharpefont
Editor: Ralph Macchio
Publisher: Marvel Comics
Price: $29.99

Take a gander at the list of artists involved in the Ultimate Marvel Team-Up Ultimate Collection trade paperback. Even the slightest of comic fans are bound to see a name they recognize, but don't get too excited. Many of these artists have complete issues in this collection, but just as many only have two or three pages in the book's finale, the Ultimate Spider-Man Super Special. Because of the wide range of artists, there's some issues where the art feels great and others where it suffers, but it's hard to complain about getting this much variety. If nothing else, it serves as a really nice testing ground for a large group of artists to find out who you like.

This massive seventeen-issue collection of the complete run of the Ultimate Marvel Team-Up is the perfect book to pick up on a night where you have nothing going on and just blast through in one or two sittings. As with so much of the Ultimate universe's content, the stories here are light reading that move swiftly but are also strangely compelling. As the title suggests, this one focuses on the various superheroes of the Ultimate universe teaming up with Spider-Man. This means writer Brian Michael Bendis, who has already proven his worth on the main Ultimate Spider-Man book, can employ his legion of artists in exploring all the various corners of the Ultimate universe, many for the first time.

The Ultimate universe has only been around for about six or seven years now, and it was even younger when these issues were originally written. That being the case, a ton of well-known Marvel characters are introduced into the Ultimate universe for the first time here, including obvious choices like Daredevil and Punisher, but also such unlikely subjects as Dr. Strange and Man-Thing. No Ultimate Man-Thing jokes, please. A lot of the characters have reasonably similar origins to their original universe counter-parts, but the best part is seeing the new ways their personalities develop and how their relationships with Ultimate Spider-Man form.

Bendis obviously has a tight grasp on the young Peter Parker, as every one of these relationships feels completely natural. Super-scientist/billionaire Iron Man is a role model. Wolverine is the cool "relative" that Parker wants to be. And responsible, law-obsessed Daredevil is full of haughty distrust for the amateur hero. This is wonderful stuff that both builds on and completely changes the original Marvel characters in ways that are undeniably entertaining. This collection represents an altogether successful experiment in Marvel's new universe; no other book in the Ultimate imprint could add as much to the universe as a second run of this one would. How about it Marvel?

Bottom Line:
Despite a couple weird continuity glitches and one or two stories that are obviously no longer considered cannon (the Fantastic Four issue in particular), the value and quality of this collection are far above average. Think of it this way: buying each of these issues on their own would have cost well over $50. And they're good stories.

Rating: Worth the time and money. (4 1/2 out of 5 EvilEyes)
http://www.evilavatar.com/images/icons/e4_5.jpg

Sazime
10-29-2006, 07:32 AM
Speaking of continuity glitches, there are a couple in the first few Ultimate books. Although, when compared with regular Marvel U, they're minor. It's funny evening noticing them, but who can read Ultimate trade and not pick that up?

Action Comics sold out pretty damn quick from our shop, and I did not have it pulled. Yes, sacreligous, I know. I just didn't have a huge interest in picking up yet another run of something. Glad to hear it's started well though. If it continues I'll have to grab it in trade.

Heretic Machine
10-29-2006, 07:49 AM
I wasn't exactly wowed by Sensational this week (it is the only one of those comics that I read). A lot of build up to a nothing-fight and a slight twist at the end. Very bleh, in my opinion, especially since I read it right after reading the new Captain America (which was awesome). In fact, I haven't liked most of this Unmasked stuff, it just seems like they are using it as an excuse to toss a bunch of random villains at Spider-man.

Savok
10-29-2006, 08:52 AM
I wonder if Marvel will ever run out of adjectives for Spiderman/X-Men so on.

Sazime
10-29-2006, 09:03 AM
I wonder if Marvel will ever run out of adjectives for Spiderman/X-Men so on.
Only after they've used up all the adjectives in the dictionary, then they'll have to start making up new ones. :D

Bruss25
10-29-2006, 09:24 AM
Starring the Antisemetic Spiderman!

JazGalaxy
10-29-2006, 11:24 AM
I think it's bizarre how superman, who is supposed to be man's fantasy of being more than his limitations, has somehow become such a science fiction schock fest.

"While flying around, superman finds a rockethsip bound for earth with an 8 year old baby in it"

Okay... already I'm completely alienated. My suspension of disbelief has been used up entirely in any superman story before it begins because I'm following the adventures of an alien. That is not grounds for heaping more unbelievable crap on top of it, it should be grounds to slow things up and deal with more inalienably human issues.

Kefkataran
10-29-2006, 12:02 PM
In fact, I haven't liked most of this Unmasked stuff, it just seems like they are using it as an excuse to toss a bunch of random villains at Spider-man.

To be fair, the arc was named "The Deadly Foes of Peter Parker". It only makes sense that it would feature a ton of villains.

Starring the Antisemetic Spiderman!

Mel Gibson bit by a radioactive spider? I'd buy it.

I think it's bizarre how superman, who is supposed to be man's fantasy of being more than his limitations, has somehow become such a science fiction schock fest.

"While flying around, superman finds a rockethsip bound for earth with an 8 year old baby in it"

Has somehow become? Whaa? Dude, have you ever read a golden age or silver age Superman story? Every single one was just like this. Every one. If anything, the past six months of Supes stories (since Kurt Busiek took over) have been much more focused on the human element of Superman. And this new Geoff Johns/Richard Donner arc is bound to deal with that slightly less so when it starts out with Superman's father reminding him that he's not human. That's the whole point.

Edit: Let me make a minor correction. Every single golden age and silver age story was just like this with one big difference... they didn't have the actual writing skill behind them to make them compelling beyond the crazy concept.

cppcrusader
10-29-2006, 12:18 PM
...it should be grounds to slow things up and deal with more inalienably human issues.

So Supes wanting to be a father isn't human enough? Or do you mean they should do more of the tired and overdone stories about him wanting to belong to the human race even though he will always be an outsider no matter how close he comes to being a part of it?

Savok
10-29-2006, 08:07 PM
Has somehow become? Whaa? Dude, have you ever read a golden age or silver age Superman story? Every single one was just like this. Every one. If anything, the past six months of Supes stories (since Kurt Busiek took over) have been much more focused on the human element of Superman. And this new Geoff Johns/Richard Donner arc is bound to deal with that slightly less so when it starts out with Superman's father reminding him that he's not human. That's the whole point.

Edit: Let me make a minor correction. Every single golden age and silver age story was just like this with one big difference... they didn't have the actual writing skill behind them to make them compelling beyond the crazy concept.
Every time Jimmy Olsen gets super powers, take a drink.

Sazime
10-29-2006, 10:25 PM
Every time Jimmy Olsen gets super powers, take a drink.
Um, four, I think?

Savok
10-29-2006, 10:38 PM
http://www.superdickery.com/

Kefkataran
10-29-2006, 10:52 PM
Every time Jimmy Olsen gets super powers, take a drink.

Ha, fucking exactly. To that end: I'm planning to do a review of Showcase Presents: Superman Family Vol. 1 soon. I'll keep a running tally of how many times Olson gets powers just for you!

Deadend
10-29-2006, 10:52 PM
Ohh, it looks like someone is going to make a good Super-man arc. Character Development, yay!

Also that Supes would attack the US military is a good sign too. But I got a feeling the arc will end in tragedy for Clark, unless this is how Conner is going to be brought back into things.

Superman and Kryponians always weirded me out. As I am cool with him having amazing powers, but JUST because he is from Krypton is the part I do not like. It means to say the only thing special about him, is that he is the last of his kind, and were he not the last one, he would be nothing special besides his mindset.
I think that it is because of the whole... innateness of alien powers. Superman by his nature is better than a human, he was not granted more power, or earned, or have a accident occur. Nothing happened to make him the way he is physically. Almost every other hero was elevated in some manner. Super-man JUST IS that way.

Well, I still think the Donner arc has MASSIVE Potential, considering you got a great modern writer, and the guy who gave us 2 of the best Super-man stories ever.

Kefkataran
10-29-2006, 10:57 PM
Ohh, it looks like someone is going to make a good Super-man arc. Character Development, yay!

Every Kurt Busiek/Geoff Johns Superman arc since One Year Later started has been high quality. So has Grant Morrison's whole run on All-Star Superman so far. Just saying. :)

unless this is how Conner is going to be brought back into things.

I really don't think or hope that Conner will return, but a lot of people are leaning towards this new Kryptonian being his eventual replacement...

Nothing happened to make him the way he is physically. Almost every other hero was elevated in some manner. Super-man JUST IS that way.

True, but he does have some comparisons to the tragic origin stories of so many other characters. I mean he did lose his family and his whole world.


Well, I still think the Donner arc has MASSIVE Potential, considering you got a great modern writer, and the guy who gave us 2 of the best Super-man stories ever.

I find it funny that people are so excited about Donner when I'm fairly certain Geoff Johns is really doing most of the heavy lifting here. From what he's said, he and Donner talk out the arcs and he does all the scripting. But I agree. Think it's gonna be good stuff!

thecrazyd
10-29-2006, 11:02 PM
True, but he does have some comparisons to the tragic origin stories of so many other characters. I mean he did lose his family and his whole world.
His family that he never knew, and the world he wasn't really a part of.

Kefkataran
10-29-2006, 11:04 PM
His family that he never knew, and the world he wasn't really a part of.

As has been mentioned though, there's been a million stories (some great, some terrible) chronicling how he's stuck as an alien on this world, can never know his true family/people, but still can never completely be a part of our world. Like it or not, there's some pathos there. It's just that a lot of readers (and an equal number of writers, unfortunately) like ignoring it.

thecrazyd
10-29-2006, 11:07 PM
As has been mentioned though, there's been a million stories (some great, some terrible) chronicling how he's stuck as an alien on this world, can never know his true family/people, but still can never completely be a part of our world. Like it or not, there's some pathos there. It's just that a lot of readers (and an equal number of writers, unfortunately) like ignoring it.
Yeah, but who cares if he is an alien if he looks human, acts human, and was raised as a human? He doesn't really know what he was missing.

Deadend
10-29-2006, 11:32 PM
I think the Martian Manhunter is a much better study upon the idea of an ultimate outsider.

Superman can blend in and pretend to be human. He can give up being Superman and will only be an outsider in his own mind.

But too much outsider angst would be bad for him. Even though the idea of a guy who can hear everyones heart beating, and yet feels isolated and alone at the same time can be great.

Aww man, I would love to see a really good mini-series about young Superman, just about him feeling like an outsider, and ending with him deciding to protect his world. Even though that would change his background, as he is raised to lend a hand to others.

Superman is a character who has so much potential for anything as far as storytelling. As you can play up all these different aspects of his character as needed, and yet the main defining characteristic is that Superman always tries to do the right thing.

And I, and everyone else keep mentioning Donner even though Jones does most of the writing is that Donner has an amazing sense for what makes Superman tick and how to examine it. Go back and watch Superman the Movie and to a lesser extent, Superman 2. Really are within the top 5 Superman stories, which means that on Superman, Donner has been batting 100% so far.

I think Donner is supplying the overall storyarc and most of the details, but Jones makes it into script and such. Sort of like Donner is directing a comic, written by Jones and with art by Kubart.

I also love All-Star Superman, even if they had to take Superman out of continuity to make him shine as bright as he can.

Kefkataran
10-29-2006, 11:37 PM
Yeah, but who cares if he is an alien if he looks human, acts human, and was raised as a human? He doesn't really know what he was missing.

Actually, he does know what he's missing, if only because of the whole Fortress of Solitude thing that's given him access to all the memories of what Krypton and his family was. And anyone who has never met their natural parents knows that there's almost always a sort of sadness in wondering who and what they were. Just because you can't feel empathy, again, does not mean the pathos is not there.

I think the Martian Manhunter is a much better study upon the idea of an ultimate outsider.

Superman can blend in and pretend to be human. He can give up being Superman and will only be an outsider in his own mind.

True on both, although Martian Manhunter can blend in too. His whole story was originally based around him learning to blend in. But I agree that he's a better 'outsider' character than Supes.


And I, and everyone else keep mentioning Donner even though Jones does most of the writing is that Donner has an amazing sense for what makes Superman tick and how to examine it. Go back and watch Superman the Movie and to a lesser extent, Superman 2. Really are within the top 5 Superman stories, which means that on Superman, Donner has been batting 100% so far.

I'm not as huge a fan of the Superman films (though I'm excited to see the new Superman 2 Donner Cut), but I agree that the man has a complete grasp on telling good Superman stories. His involvement is nice, no doubt. Also, it's Johns writing, not Jones. And again, Johns has been interviewed several times and said more or less that he and Donner have split plotting details with him doing all the scripting.

Savok
10-30-2006, 12:01 AM
Best Supes I've seen is Hereafter p2 of the Justice League cartoon. It's like DC's take on the Fallout universe, only without Vault Boy or the vaults... or civilization but still. On that note Hereafter p1 was great as well.

Kefkataran
10-30-2006, 12:03 AM
Of course, the Justice League cartoon is good at almost everything it does. I'd also checkout the Superman Animated Series

Savok
10-30-2006, 12:18 AM
I would only they stick it on at like 7am.

Kefkataran
10-30-2006, 12:26 AM
As long as we're on the topic of DC cartoons, anyone else checked out Legion of Superheroes yet?

Dr.Finger
10-30-2006, 06:33 AM
I think the Martian Manhunter is a much better study upon the idea of an ultimate outsider.

Superman can blend in and pretend to be human. He can give up being Superman and will only be an outsider in his own mind.

But too much outsider angst would be bad for him. Even though the idea of a guy who can hear everyones heart beating, and yet feels isolated and alone at the same time can be great.The recent arc in Superman with Subjekt-17 is also a great study of this. He was basically an alien baby (actually still in utero) that gained powers in Earth's atmosphere when he crashed, but because he looked alien and landed in the Soviet Union he was experimented on and tortured.

DevilUknow
10-30-2006, 10:11 AM
I really like the David "Bill" Carradine's soliliquy version of Superman.

That Superman was his real identity and Clark was how he though of the rest of humanity.

That he has this awsome power and such a low opinion of man kind, that he uses his powers to help and protec them makes him the hero.

Kind of like a rich lawyer going pro bono, or a world class surgeon leaving his practice to work in an inner city free clinic.

I've just never liked the Superman books.

That hey invented Doomsday to kill him sucked. Instead they should have had Lex Luthor force Supes to kill himself to save the world (and thus Lex Luthor takes over the world, resulting in a year long arc about an underground network of super heroes fighting Lex and trying to bring superman back, hense the legion of super clones, yes yes I know its nerdy)

Kefkataran
10-30-2006, 10:28 AM
I've always thought it crazy to say "I've never liked x book" when it's a book that's had more than two or three writers, as there's almost definitely bound to be some great material SOMEWHERE there. And Superman, of course, has been written by so many people in so many styles in so many stories that there's plenty of great Superman tales if you care to look.

thecrazyd
10-30-2006, 10:50 AM
I've always thought it crazy to say "I've never liked x book" when it's a book that's had more than two or three writers, as there's almost definitely bound to be some great material SOMEWHERE there. And Superman, of course, has been written by so many people in so many styles in so many stories that there's plenty of great Superman tales if you care to look.
You don't see how it is possible to not be interested in the character, or the style of the stories?

Kefkataran
10-30-2006, 10:53 AM
You don't see how it is possible to not be interested in the character, or the style of the stories?

Didn't say that. It's totally possible, I just think it's crazy personally.

Heretic Machine
10-30-2006, 10:56 AM
Best Supes I've seen is Hereafter p2 of the Justice League cartoon. It's like DC's take on the Fallout universe, only without Vault Boy or the vaults... or civilization but still. On that note Hereafter p1 was great as well.

I loved Hereafter... that was pretty much the peak of the Justice Leauge cartoon for me.

Xerxes
10-30-2006, 12:16 PM
The Splendiferous Spider-man.