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Old 12-10-2006, 07:38 AM   #1
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[Comics] - Evil Avatar's Weekly Comic Book Reviews - Year 2 - Week 50

Welcome to week Fifty of Evil Avatar’s Weekly Comic Book Reviews.

BCBComics is offering a ongoing code of “EVERLOST” to be used give an extra 10% off to Evil Avatar readers. In addition a special page has been set up by BCBComics to save money on various comics, TPBs, games and toys related to the comics that are reviewed each week.

Remember, these are NOT spoiler-free reviews.

Week Fifty
Evil Avatar's Weekly Comic Book Reviews - Year 2 - Week 50

Justice Society of America #1
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writer: Geoff Johns
Penciller: Dale Eaglesham
Inker: Art Thibert
Colorist: Jeromy Cox
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Editor: Stephen Wacker & Eddie Berganza
$3.99



"The Next Age, part 1"

In a flashback to the missing year the JSA is shown fighting in World War III. Afterwards Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman, all implicitly absent from the battle, thank the JSA elders for everything they've done and offer to help them in their new endeavor: being a moral compass and making better good guys. Back in the present former FBI agent Trey Thomson, the Mystery Man known as Mr. America, is called to a crime scene, the murder of his wife and two young sons. In New York the JSA founders, Green Lantern, Flash and Wildcat go over the candidates for the new team. The League had been tracing the legacies and bloodlines of former JSA members and they were determining whom to recruit. Wildcat, uncomfortable in the role of elder statesman, tells Alan and Jay they should pick the team, he'll get to know them in the ring. Slowly the new team begins to take shape. Damage, after a battle with The Rebel, is recruited by the newlywed Hourman and Liberty Belle. Maxine Hunkel, granddaughter of the original, human Red Tornado, and newfound possessor of wind powers is recruited at Harvard by Power Girl and Mr. Terrific. In Opal City Stargirl and Dr. Mid-Nite find the mysterious new Starman in a sanitarium. He is suffering from a form of schizophrenia, hearing voices and acting strangely. He checked himself into the sanitarium and leaves only to save lives around the city. When approached he asks Dr. Mid-Nite to help him find his mind. Back in Virginia Mr. America tracks down the man that killed his family, a meta-human killer known as Catalyst. He beats some information out of Catalyst that leads him to Boston where he is ambushed. In New York, as the new members of the JSA meet for the first time the founders are taking Wildcat to Brooklyn. Just as the meeting is about to begin a bleeding and broken Mr. America crashes through the skylight and onto the meeting table while in Brooklyn Green Lantern and Flash show Wildcat his long lost son. The book ends with a single page teaser showing scenes from the upcoming year. (The teaser page can be seen here)

Now that is how you relaunch a series. Unlike several recent relaunches Authority this one is not only a tease for the stories to come, it's a great issue in it's own right. Lots of questions and mysteries have been laid out for the reader to ponder but they never subsume the ultimate selling point of the book: the world's first, and greatest, superteam. Eaglesham is simply one of the most underappreciated pencillers in comics today. He isn't flashy or super-realistic, but the amount of information he can portray with posing and facial expressions adds a tremendous layer to the book. What else? Oh yeah, the last page, "Coming this year in Justice Society". If those four panels don't hook you nothing will. Overall there isn't very much bad to say about this book. It does play in the deep end of the DC continuity pool, but never leaves you struggling for answers.

Bottom Line:
The return of the first superteam in spectacular fashion.

Rating: A Must Buy. (5 out of 5 EvilEyes)


newuniversal #1
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writer: Warren Ellis
Artist: Salvador Larocca
Colorist: Jason Keith
Letterer: Rus Wooton
Editor: Axel Alonso
$2.99



"Enter"

In a world with some odd changes to our history (McCartney was killed instead of Lennon, China became the spacepower) we see a few slices of life. A New York cop shot in the head and left brain-dead. Pair of young lovers, Keith and Madeline, spend the night in a field in Oklahoma. A Japanese club girl named Izanami parties in San Francisco. All fairly normal, until The White Event, a brilliant flash of light that for a moment lit up the entire world. It also changed some lives. In San Francisco the club girl wakes up in a dreamscape where a massive satellite tells her that everything has changed. In New York the brain-dead cop floats above his hospital bed before reviving. He looks at the nurse treating him and sees that he had killed dozens of patients. The nurse claims that they were mercy killings but the cop still stabs him to death, leaving the word 'Justice' scrawled in blood on the wall of his room. In Oklahoma Keith wakes up to find Madeline burnt to death next to him as she lay in the middle of a giant starburst symbol burnt into the ground. In Latvia an archeologist examines a tomb that was exposed in a landslip triggered by The White Event. Inside they find an ancient skeleton with the starburst symbol etched in its forehead. Back in Oklahoma Keith is arrested by Madeline's father, the Sheriff, for murder and finds the starburst symbol glowing on his hand.

(First a little background. In the late 80's Marvel tried to create a line of more realistic superhero comics set in their own universe. This 'New Universe' was supposed to forsake most of the genre conventions: no codenames, no costumes and real consequences. The line never caught on and eventually faded into obscurity, until now.)

Potential. Sometimes it's a good thing, but more often than not it's a four-letter word. The potential in this book is also a double-edged sword. On the good side it's a fairly blank slate that combines elements of super-science and cosmology with superheroics, stuff that should be right up Warren Ellis' alley. On the bad side this issue felt like you had to be familiar with a line of comics that hasn't been published in 15 years to really understand everything. In the end it works, but doesn't really grab me...yet. Larocca's art is beautiful but the decision to model all of the main characters after real celebrities is a bit disconcerting. And when I say model I mean that they look exactly like Nicole Kidman and James Ford (Sawyer from Lost). In the long run it may work, but for now it was just odd. Overall the book didn't do its primary job. I wasn't hooked on any of the characters or the central conceit of the series. The book itself wasn't bad, but it could have been, maybe should have been, better.

Bottom Line:
A noble effort that just hasn't shown enough either way to render a final judgment.

Rating: Decent, but leaf through it before buying it. (3 out of 5 EvilEyes)


Manhunter #26
Reviewed By: Michael Chauvet (Doctor Finger)
Writer: Marc Andreyko
Penciller: Javier Pina
Inker: Robin Riggs
Colorist: Jason Wright
Letterer: Travis Lanham
Editor: Joan Hilty
$2.99



"Unleashed, part 1. The Lady in Question"


Manhunter, nee Kate Spencer, fights Wonder Woman in a dark forest. Wonder Woman has all of the advantages but Kate gets in some good shots before the magic lasso ties her up. One day before Diana comes to Kate's law firm. Diana knows that Kate is Manhunter and needs her help as a lawyer. She is about to be indicted by the feds for the murder of Max Lord. Kate agrees to defend Wonder Woman, if she will help train her. Somewhere in the Himalayas Mark Shaw, a former Manhunter, searches for answers to his frequent blackouts. He asks a village woman if she has seen the object in a picture and she screams, accusing Shaw of bringing devils and curses down on them. In moments the village is empty and a group of men in evil-looking armor stand atop the buildings. Back in LA Kate's friend Cameron Chase receives a call from her sister, who is being held captive by the super villain that killed their father, Dr. Trapp. He orders her to come to Gotham, alone. Back in the present Diana and Kate continue to spar, but Diana ultimately gets the upper hand after using the flying tiara. Diana confides to Kate that she believes that one of her enemies is using the murder prosecution to strike at her, a feeling that is confirmed on the next page when a shadowed man in DC confides to an unseen associate that he'd like nothing more than to kill Diana.

Ah, Manhunter, how I missed thee. Not many books can pull off jokes about scientologists and Hollywood plastic surgery disasters while still staying firmly in superhero territory but this one pulls it off. The story of Kate Spencer is interesting, but just as interesting is her supporting cast, Cameron Chase and Mark Shaw. You essentially have three parallel stories going in one book. But while their stories interest me the main plot, Wonder Woman and her impending trial, isn't all that interesting. Maybe it's because I know there aren't going to be any real consequences for the character, especially since this isn't even Wonder Woman's book. Maybe it's because I was sick to death of the Diana-killed-Max Lord storyline a full year ago, but I just don't care about it. The book is still very good, and Pina's becoming an A+ artist, but the main story is just meh. I'm glad the book was saved from the chopping block, and that DC is putting a lot of muscle behind it, but the main plot just doesn't grab me.

Bottom Line:
A good issue, but good enough to once again save the book from cancellation? Not quite.

Rating: Decent, but leaf through it before buying it. (3 out of 5 EvilEyes)
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Old 12-10-2006, 07:44 AM   #2
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Avengers Forever
Reviewed By: Philip Kollar (Kefkataran)
Writers: Kurt Busiek and Roger Stern
Penciler: Carlos Pacheco
Inker: Jesus Merino
Colors: Steve Oliff
Letters: Albert Deschesne
Editor: Tom Brevoort
Publisher: Marvel Comics
Price: $24.99



Kurt Busiek knows the Avengers. Kurt Busiek loves the Avengers. In the self-contained Avengers Forever mini-series, all twelve issues of which are collected in this $25 trade, proves that he's probably the most Avenger-knowledgeable guy in the whole comic book industry. The very concept - taking a handful of Avengers from various points in time, past, present, and future, and putting them on a time-traveling adventure that has them running into even more Avengers -- requires a fair amount of previous Marvel universe reading. But Busiek's gone above and beyond the call of duty here to the point where it almost makes your head hurt.

The first key to success in this story is that Busiek can take any Avenger from any time period for this story, leaving him a lot of freedom to pull out some of the most interesting people. Of course we get a Hawkeye (interestingly without his arrows at first), but there's also Captain America from the '70s stories (during the Watergate scandal) where he briefly lost faith in America. We get the version of Hank Pym (as Giant Man) who was currently starring in Busiek's run on the main Avengers title and is not all that exciting, but we also get the classic deranged Yellowjacket who doesn't realize that he's also Hank Pym because of his split personality disorder. The Wasp leads the team, and rounding it off are two future Avengers, Songbird (a Thunderbolt at the time Avengers Forever was published) and Captain Marvel (Genis-Vell, the original Captain Marvel's son). Busiek also provides a smorgasbord of some of the Avenger's greatest villains thrown into the mix: Immortus, Kang the Conqueror, the Supreme Intelligence, Libra, and the Time Keepers. Not all of these foes actually function as bad guys in the story, and part of the fun is actually uncovering the complex ties between the different characters, finding out who's really on what side and why.

Time-travel stories in comics always run a heightened risk of being terrible, perhaps even more so than in any other medium because of their potential to destroy continuity. There's also always that chance of ruining good story with excess sci-fi/metaphysical mumbo-jumbo. Again Busiek shows his skill as a comic writer and Marvel historian by not falling into either of these traps. The story does contain huge, ridiculous plot ideas, but in a way that feels natural in an Avengers comic, and these are thankfully balanced by strong character moments. There's an awful lot of a dialogue, but it's put to good use telling a rather fascinating story. The only really week spots are a couple issues in the middle (annoyingly placed back-to-back) that are almost completely devoted to flashbacks instead of moving the main tale forward.

Carlos Pacheco's artwork also deserves commendation. There probably aren't many people who would call Pacheco the best artist alive, but he does extremely solid, sometimes spectacular superhero work. He especially shines in this story on the splash pages near the end that feature huge amounts of characters all crowded together on one page. It recalls (and in some instances surpasses) some of the great Perez splash pages from Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Bottom Line:
If you're looking for one of those classic, epic Avengers tales, this is one of the best. Busiek's great writing sprinkles in great characterization with the over-the-top, time-spanning superhero action. If that stuff doesn't impress you, Busiek's meticulous notes explaining what issues in continuity every single past (and some future!) event described in the story happens will! This book also provides an interesting counter-point to Bendis's less bombastic, more down-to-earth New Avengers that explains why long-time Avengers fans may not appreciate Bendis's take so much.

Rating: Worth the money and time. (4 out of 5 EvilEyes)


The Complete Ballad of Halo Jones
Reviewed By: Philip Kollar (Kefkataran)
Writer: Alan Moore
Artist: Ian Gibson
Letterers: Steve Potter and Richard Starkings
Publisher: Titan Books / 2000 AD
Price: $19.99



Even the slightest of comic readers have, in most cases, probably read Alan Moore's highly praised DC work at some point. V For Vendetta, Watchmen, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - these stories are widely considered to be some of the best in the whole of comic book history. Despite that a shockingly small number of readers seem to have dug deeper into Moore's bibliography, leaving books like The Ballad of Halo Jones sadly obscure.

Originally published in short installments in Britain's sci-fi magazine 2000 AD, The Ballad of Halo Jones is split into three books with ten parts each (fifteen for the final book) that have all been pulled together for this nicely-sized volume. The first book covers a deceptively simple story of the title character going on a shopping trip in her current town of residence, a slum of the future. Each subsequent volume raises the stakes, slowly but surely turning the story of Halo Jones into a real epic, a space soap opera on the same level as Star Wars.

The first story arc here, covering a fairly boring, every-day event, runs the severe risk of being completely boring right up until the very end when it gets turned on its head, leading to the much more interesting events of the later books. Moore has this wonderful habit of having important things happening in the background eventually work themselves into the core of the plot. In this book, for example, the first half is full of occasional news reports interrupting the flow of the story to give updates on the fate of an ancient cruise ship destined to be destroyed and the progress of the current war between Earth and a space system called Tarantula, both of which end up being important stops in Halo's journey.

One of the most impressive parts of Moore's writing here is his manipulation of language. The characters all use words and slang that are totally unfamiliar at first and yet still seem like a natural evolution of modern English. It really takes some time to get used to this, but after a while readers will catch on to enough phrases to start understanding. This might even spur multiple readings. As with all good science fiction, Ballad of Halo Jones has some connections to reality as well. The war that's taking place throughout has a lot of similarities to the Cold War and the Vietnam War - enough, at least, to seem relevant while not being overwhelming or even remotely preachy.

Not only does Moore pull off perfect socially aware science fiction here, he also carefully builds up a well-rounded, almost unbelievably realized character. By the time readers finish The Complete Ballad of Halo Jones, they will feel like they truly know Halo. Without all the wonderful characterization by Moore, the ending might feel needlessly or even frustratingly ambiguous, but because of how familiar Halo feels by that point, it isn't. If you've been paying attention, it just makes sense.

Bottom Line:
It's hard to say why this project hasn't received as much praise or discussion as some of Moore's other work. Maybe it's the obscure publisher. Maybe it's the black and white art (though it shouldn't be - Gibson does great work here). Or maybe it's just the back of the book's slightly terrifying promise of "the first feminist heroine in comics." But whatever the reason, it should be amended as soon as possible. Alan Moore has pulled off an amazing science fiction adventure story that also manages to be very personal. Perhaps most surprisingly, Moore has created a female protagonist who is just as strong, interesting, and realistic as any of the female leads you'd find in a Women's Fiction course.

Rating: More than worth the money and time. (4.5 out of 5 EvilEyes)


Quick Hits

Walking Dead #33: One of the most disturbing books I've ever read. The Governor deserved what he got, but it was still uncomfortable to read.
Detective Comics #826: A prime example of why the Joker is such a great villain.
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Old 12-10-2006, 09:41 AM   #3
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The JSA Review shows 5 Evil Eyes, but the text says 3. Your review makes it sound like you meant 5.

I hope my store still has a copy of JSA when I go today.
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Old 12-10-2006, 09:58 AM   #4
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Fixed. Thank you.
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Old 12-10-2006, 11:25 AM   #5
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I really do not see how anyone can make any kind of judgment on Newuniversals, seeing how it was entirely a setup issue. Of course you do not feel emotionally attached to any of the characters. They were only shown in very brief segments.

And you do not need any knowledge of the old Newuniversals book to read it. Ellis has stated that it will not tie into the old stories at all, and the only shared ties between the two are premise and name.
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Old 12-10-2006, 12:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
I really do not see how anyone can make any kind of judgment on Newuniversals, seeing how it was entirely a setup issue. Of course you do not feel emotionally attached to any of the characters. They were only shown in very brief segments.
I'm assuming he took that in mind when writing the review and decided it was a '3' of a setup issue. There's still some big issues with the book, such as the obvious overuse of photo-referencing in the art and the fact that Ellis stole the concept of Mcartney being assassinated instead of Lennon from Matt Fraction's Casanova-verse. Motherfucker. That said, I'm sure Newuniversal's going to get better as it progresses.

And holy shit was Justice Society of America #1 a great comic. Anyone remotely interested in the DC universe who didn't pick this one up, should. And I mean you, Brock.
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Old 12-10-2006, 01:04 PM   #7
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Yeah, I'm going to have to add JSA to my pull list.
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Old 12-10-2006, 01:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefkataran
I'm assuming he took that in mind when writing the review and decided it was a '3' of a setup issue. There's still some big issues with the book, such as the obvious overuse of photo-referencing in the art and the fact that Ellis stole the concept of Mcartney being assassinated instead of Lennon from Matt Fraction's Casanova-verse. Motherfucker. That said, I'm sure Newuniversal's going to get better as it progresses.
Ellis loves Fraction's Casanova, so how do you know it's not an homage to him? It's like saying the Zucker's ripped off the Marx Bros. when they made Brain Donors. I'd say it's a tip of the hat, not a rip at all.

As far as photo referencing goes, what about the art in Ex Machina, Wanted or anything Alex Ross does? Celebs are just easily accessible and their photo cataloges cost less time and money than hiring models. So really, whoopee?
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecrazyd
I really do not see how anyone can make any kind of judgment on Newuniversals, seeing how it was entirely a setup issue. Of course you do not feel emotionally attached to any of the characters. They were only shown in very brief segments.
This, on the other hand, I totally agree with. Look at Casanova #1. I enjoyed it, but it was one of the most confusing setups either. Oh, speaking of which, Mic Jagger anyone? Photo referencing? I mean come on. I won't let that one die Phil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefkataran
And holy shit was Justice Society of America #1 a great comic. Anyone remotely interested in the DC universe who didn't pick this one up, should. And I mean you, Brock.
Speaking of first issues, it was great. But you know who enjoys these types of firsts even more? People who know the universe. "I'll get to know them in the ring" is probably one of the more confusing lines for anyone not familiar with Black Cat. I think it was a better 1st (if you can really call the relaunching of a series a true "1st" issue) than newuniversal, but you can't really compare the two beyond plot setups. JSA did a much better job at that.
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Old 12-10-2006, 01:59 PM   #9
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I had no interest in JSA #1, despite the glowing praise. Even that teaser pic, which looked good, meant absolutely nothing to me. I just don't have as firm a grasp on DC history as I guess I need to in order to be excited about that book.

Quote:
Unlike several recent relaunches Authority this one is not only a tease for the stories to come, it's a great issue in it's own right.
I think you meant to put parentheses around Authority, right?

As for newuniversal, I didn't get it (planning on getting the trades) but that review made it sound great. From the summary Dr. Finger gave, I could totally see this book surviving nowadays. Almost all of the books around these days seem to be taking the route of having heroes take consequences for their actions and not being as fantastic as they used to be. It was a radical idea years ago but it's downright commonplace now. Colour me interested.
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Old 12-10-2006, 02:03 PM   #10
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Ellis loves Fraction's Casanova, so how do you know it's not an homage to him? It's like saying the Zucker's ripped off the Marx Bros. when they made Brain Donors. I'd say it's a tip of the hat, not a rip at all.
I'd be hard-pressed to call something completely torn (the exact concept) from a book that's just hitting the shelves months before his comes out a "homage". That said, I know Ellis and Fraction are somewhat buddies and all, so I'm not actually that serious about it being a big deal.

Quote:
As far as photo referencing goes, what about the art in Ex Machina, Wanted or anything Alex Ross does? Celebs are just easily accessible and their photo cataloges cost less time and money than hiring models. So really, whoopee?
Okay. But to some people it's a big deal (and thoroughly distracting) that instead of Ellis's characters, you're getting Bruce Willis and Johnny Depp. More importantly, though, Marvel just recently implemented a new stance that's very against this kind of blatant photo-referencing. That's the bigger issue.

Quote:
Oh, speaking of which, Mic Jagger anyone? Photo referencing? I mean come on. I won't let that one die Phil.
The main character of Casanova maybe somewhat resembles Jagger, but the art's far too abstracted to be distracting in those terms. I'll agree, though, that Casanova #1 was a really confusing set-up issue. Most people reading it will say flat-out that it's been getting better and better with each issue.

Quote:
Speaking of first issues, it was great. But you know who enjoys these types of firsts even more? People who know the universe. "I'll get to know them in the ring" is probably one of the more confusing lines for anyone not familiar with Black Cat. I think it was a better 1st (if you can really call the relaunching of a series a true "1st" issue) than newuniversal, but you can't really compare the two beyond plot setups. JSA did a much better job at that.
1.) It's Wildcat.

2.) I wasn't comparing the two issues at all, just saying that I thought Justice Society #1 was freakin' awesome.

3.) I said it's a must-have for anyone remotely interested in the DCU, so that would imply some prior knowledge. That said, I still don't think it's very confusing for relative newbies either. The main characters are all introduced in the little bubbles at the beginning, which explain right away, for example, that Ted was a former heavyweight champion, thus making it easy to understad the "ring" comment. And the real focus (and the reason I loved the issue so much) is on introducing the new characters, all of whom have a fantastic personality that should lend itself to this being one of the most interesting superhero team books on the shelves.

Also, to be fair, Newuniversal is sort of a relaunching of a series (or a previous line, at least) as well. The big difference being, obviously, that with Newuniversal you don't need to know all the old stuff as it doesn't connect, but I'm betting there's going to be nice easter eggs and easier access for those who do know the old stuff. Which is how a relaunching Justice Society would theoretically (and so far has) work as well.

Quote:
I had no interest in JSA #1, despite the glowing praise. Even that teaser pic, which looked good, meant absolutely nothing to me. I just don't have as firm a grasp on DC history as I guess I need to in order to be excited about that book.
Trust me on this one, man. Buy the first ish and read it. If you're still not interested in the series, I'll refund you the money spent on it.
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Old 12-10-2006, 02:17 PM   #11
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1.) It's Wildcat.
Pah, you mean Old Foge. Seriously, I should know better, but I was typing fast between calls. Damn customers... making me look bad when talking about comics. *shakes fists in God's direction*
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Old 12-10-2006, 02:22 PM   #12
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Customers? What pieces of shit. Have them executed immediately.
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:49 PM   #13
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I'm going to have to take your word on newuniversals. Shop error on the pull list.

I was hoping to see a Spider-Man: Reign review. I loved it.
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:56 PM   #14
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I'm assuming he took that in mind when writing the review and decided it was a '3' of a setup issue. There's still some big issues with the book, such as the obvious overuse of photo-referencing in the art and the fact that Ellis stole the concept of Mcartney being assassinated instead of Lennon from Matt Fraction's Casanova-verse. Motherfucker. That said, I'm sure Newuniversal's going to get better as it progresses.

And holy shit was Justice Society of America #1 a great comic. Anyone remotely interested in the DC universe who didn't pick this one up, should. And I mean you, Brock.
If you want to get technical then they both stole it from Chris Claremont in New Excalibur.

I was a little hard on newuniversal because the book felt....light. I got to the end and felt like I didn't get a full issue. Not the way to launch an admittedly high concept new book, even if it has a top shelf creative team.

And it wasn't tracing or photo referencing (a la Greg Land) in newuniversal. It was using real celebs as models. Like Ultimate Nick Fury/Sam Jackson, Max Lord/Sam Neill and John Constantine/Sting.
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Old 12-10-2006, 06:55 PM   #15
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And it wasn't tracing or photo referencing (a la Greg Land) in newuniversal. It was using real celebs as models. Like Ultimate Nick Fury/Sam Jackson, Max Lord/Sam Neill and John Constantine/Sting.
True enough, I suppose.
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Old 12-10-2006, 07:00 PM   #16
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Is Superman in a competition with Jean Grey?
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Old 12-10-2006, 08:43 PM   #17
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Location: Morris, MN
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Quote:
Is Superman in a competition with Jean Grey?
Yes. And he will fucking win.
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Old 12-10-2006, 08:49 PM   #18
Savok
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Such is the advantage of infinite universes I suppose
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Old 12-10-2006, 09:04 PM   #19
Kefkataran
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Exactly! See, Savok, THAT'S the ticket.

Also: I really wish we could get some DC universe video games that don't suck.
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Old 12-10-2006, 09:16 PM   #20
Savok
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Superman Returns is great if you pick it up for real cheap.

Other then that.... the SNES had a Batman game based on TAS that was quite good, even needed to use special gadgets for some levels.

Actually you know what would be interesting? A Green Lantern game on the Wii.
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